Drugs Q & A

Is 1 mg of Xanax a Lot?

A dose refers to a specified amount of medication taken at one time. By contrast, the dosage is how to take the medication as prescribed: a specific amount, number, and frequency of doses over a specific period of time.

In other words, a dose is simply an amount of a medication you take at one specific time. The dosage is the dose, or amount of the drug, plus when and how often to take it. A dosage guides how you take or give the medication that’s been prescribed.

What is Xanax?

Xanax is a brand of alprazolam a benzodiazepine that works by enhancing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. Generic Xanax is also available as the brand-name medications Xanax and Xanax XR. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generic blue, green, and yellow Xanax are considered to be just as safe and effective as the original drug but tend to cost less.

Xanax is prescribed for the treatment of anxiety disorders and anxiety caused by depression. Xanax is also used to treat panic disorders with or without a fear of places and situations that might cause panic, helplessness, or embarrassment (agoraphobia).

Xanax is a federally controlled substance (C-IV) because it can be abused or lead to dependence. Xanax should be kept in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Xanax may harm others, and is against the law. Tell your healthcare provider if you have abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines, or street drugs.

Is 1 mg of Xanax a lot?

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For anxiety:
    • For oral dosage forms (solution, tablets, or orally disintegrating tablets):
      • Adults—At first, 0.25 to 0.5 milligram (mg) 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 4 mg per day.
      • Older adults—At first, 0.25 mg 2 or 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For panic disorder:
    • For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets):
      • Adults—At first, 0.5 to 1 milligram (mg) taken in the morning once a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 10 mg per day.
      • Older adults—At first, 0.5 mg taken in the morning once a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For oral dosage forms (solution, tablets, or orally disintegrating tablets):
      • Adults—At first, 0.5 milligram (mg) 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 10 mg per day.
      • Older adults—At first, 0.25 mg 2 or 3 times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

If you suspect a Xanax overdose has occurred, seek emergency medical care right away. You shouldn’t wait until your symptoms get more severe.

If you’re in the United States, you should contact the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 and await further instructions. You can also receive guidance by using their webPOISONCONTROL online tool.

If symptoms become severe, call your local emergency services. Try to stay calm and keep your body cool while you wait for emergency personnel to arrive. You shouldn’t try to make yourself throw up.

If you’re with someone who has overdosed, try to keep them awake and alert until help arrives. Take them to the emergency room or call an ambulance if they’re:

  • unconscious
  • having a seizure
  • having trouble breathing.

What should I avoid while taking Xanax?

Avoid drinking alcohol. Dangerous side effects or death could occur.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Dizziness or drowsiness can cause falls, accidents, or severe injuries.

What are the possible side effects of Xanax?

Xanax may cause other unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

•          Being forgetful

•          changes in patterns and rhythms of speech

•          clumsiness or unsteadiness

•          difficulty with coordination

•          discouragement

•          drowsiness

•          feeling sad or empty

•          irritability

•          lack of appetite

•          lightheadedness

•          loss of interest or pleasure

•          relaxed and calm

•          shakiness and unsteady walk

•          sleepiness

•          slurred speech

•          tiredness

•          trouble concentrating

•          trouble performing routine tasks

•          trouble sleeping

•          trouble speaking

•          unsteadiness, trembling, or other problems with muscle control or coordination

•          unusual tiredness or weakness

Less common

•          Blurred vision

•          body aches or pain

•          burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, “pins and needles, or tingling feelings

•          changes in behavior

•          chills

•          clay-colored stools

•          confusion about identity, place, and time

•          cough

•          dark urine

•          decrease in the frequency of urination

•          decrease in urine volume

•          diarrhea

•          difficult or labored breathing

•          difficulty in passing urine (dribbling)

•          difficulty with concentration

•          difficulty with moving

•          dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position

•          dry mouth

•          ear congestion

•          environment seems unreal

•          fainting

•          feeling of unreality

•          feeling warm

•          fever

•          general feeling of discomfort or illness

•          headache

•          inability to move the eyes

•          inability to sit still

•          increased blinking or spasms of the eyelid

•          irregular heartbeats

•          itching or rash

•          joint pain

•          lack or loss of self-control

•          loss of bladder control

•          loss of coordination

•          loss of memory

•          loss of voice

•          mood or mental changes

•          muscle aches, cramps, pain, stiffness, or weakness

•          nausea

•          need to keep moving

•          painful urination

•          problems with memory

•          restlessness

•          runny or stuffy nose

•          seeing, hearing or feeling things that are not there

•          seizures

•          sense of detachment from self or body

•          shaking

•          shivering

•          sneezing

•          sore throat

•          sticking out of the tongue

•          stomach pain

•          sweating

•          swollen joints

•          talkativeness

•          tightness in the chest

•          trouble with balance

•          twitching, twisting, or uncontrolled repetitive movements of the tongue, lips, face, arms, or legs

•          uncontrolled twisting movements of the neck, trunk, arms, or legs

•          unpleasant breath odor

•          unusual dullness or feeling of sluggishness

•          unusual facial expressions

•          unusually deep sleep

•          unusually long duration of sleep

•          vomiting of blood

•          yellow eyes or skin

Rare

•          Actions that are out of control

•          attack, assault, or force

•          chest pain

•          continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears

•          decreased awareness or responsiveness

•          deep or fast breathing with dizziness

•          ear pain

•          false or unusual sense of well-being

•          fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse

•          feeling jittery

•          feeling unusually cold

•          generalized slowing of mental and physical activity

•          hearing loss

•          hoarseness

•          lack of feeling or emotion

•          loss of control of the legs

•          loss of strength or energy

•          nightmares

•          numbness of the feet, hands, and around the mouth

•          severe sleepiness

•          shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet

•          sleep talking

•          swelling

•          talking, feeling, and acting with excitement

•          thoughts of killing oneself

•          uncaring

•          unusual weak feeling

•          voice changes

Incidence not known

•          Light-colored stools

•          upper right abdominal or stomach pain

After you stop using Xanax, get medical help right away if you have symptoms such as unusual muscle movements, being more active or talkative, sudden and severe changes in mood or behavior, confusion, hallucinations, seizures, suicidal thoughts or actions.

Some withdrawal symptoms may last up to 12 months or longer after stopping this medicine suddenly. Tell your doctor if you have ongoing anxiety, depression, problems with memory or thinking, trouble sleeping, ringing in your ears, a burning or prickly feeling, or a crawling sensation under your skin.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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